Monmouth Historic Inn

 

As is common with many Southern homes of this period Monmouth's façade has a two-storied gallery supported by four columns. One difference is that the columns are square instead of round. The gallery on the upper floor has picturesque banisters. Monmouth is a massive house with massive rooms. It is built of brick and sits on the top of a sloping hillock. It was erected about 1818 by a Mr. and Mrs. John Hankinson, from Monmouth County, New Jersey. Unfortunately the couple died shortly after moving into their new house.

In 1826, Monmouth was purchased by John A. Quitman. Mr. and Mrs. Quitman furnished the house in grandiose style. He had a fine collection of books, and she had exquisite china. The house was also well known for its paintings. The doors of Monmouth are especially lovely, with beautiful overhead and side lights. A much admired feature is the Adam style carved woodwork.

When Quitman purchased the house it had a cellar under half of it, a detached brick kitchen behind it, a garden house, and several outhouses. Originally a Federal Style house, the house was extensively renovated by Quitman, when the original brick was covered by stucco, and the portico was added to the front, along with the four square columns supporting it.

 


Calhoun Room 21

Calhoun Room 21 Calhoun Room 21 view

In 1853, Quitman added a rear gallery and southeast wing of the house, where this room is located. This room is named after John C. Calhoun. John Quitman was a fervent disciple of South Carolina Calhoun's politics. Calhoun was a leading American politician and political theorist from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. Calhoun was one of the "Great Triumvirate" or the "Immortal Trio" of Congressional leaders, along with his Congressional colleagues Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. In 1957, a Senate Committee selected John Calhoun as one of the five greatest U.S. Senators, along with Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, Robert La Follette, and Robert Taft. Calhoun, Clay, Jackson, and Quitman were acquainted with one another throughout their political careers. This room is located on the second floor of the Main House, and is accessed by stairs and located above our Quitman Lounge.

ANTEBELLUM ROOM - Queen bed, full canopy, queen sofa, 2nd floor, balcony overlooks courtyard

 


Quitman Room 22

Quitman Room 22 Quitman Room 22 view Quitman Room 22 bed

This room is located in the southeast wing of the house, which was added in 1853 by John Quitman, when he also added a rear gallery. This room is named after General Quitman, a native New Yorker, who was very influential politically, and became one of Mississippi’s most illustrious personalities. He was elected to the state legislature in 1827, and appointed state chancellor and served until 1834, when he was elected to the state senate. His command in the Mexican War was the first to enter Mexico City upon its surrender. He was awarded a very special sword by Congress and President Polk for his valor in Mexico. Quitman was elected governor of Mississippi in 1849, and served two terms. In 1855, he was elected to Congress for the first of two terms. Calhoun, Clay, Jackson, and Quitman were acquainted with one another throughout their political careers. He became one of many victims of the “National Hotel disease” that hit Washington in 1857. Although food poisoning was initially blamed for the mysterious deaths and illnesses, some historians believe that this was a form of Legionnaire’s Disease. Quitman lingered in ill health for months after returning from Washington, but eventually succumbed and died at Monmouth in 1858. This room is located on the second floor of the Main House, and is accessed by stairs and located above our Quitman Study.

ANTEBELLUM ROOM - King bed, full canopy, 2nd floor, balcony overlooks courtyard

 


 

Lovell Room 23

Lovell Room 23Levell Room 23 view from bed

This room is named after the Lovell members of the Quitman family. Quitman’s son-in-law, Joe Lovell, served in the Confederate army. Eva C. Lovell and Alice Lovell, daughters of Joe Lovell, and John Quitman’s granddaughters, moved back to Natchez in 1887 and took up residence at Monmouth. In 1914, Annie Rosalie Quitman Duncan, the last surviving child of John and Eliza Quitman, died at Monmouth and left Monmouth to her nieces, Eva Lovell and Alice Lovell. This room is located on the second floor of the Main House, and is accessed by stairs and located above our Restaurant 1818.

ANTEBELLUM ROOM - King bed, full canopy, 2nd floor, opens to central hallway 

 


Clay Room 24

Clay RoomView of Clay Room from side

This room is named for Henry Clay of Kentucky, one of Monmouth's renowned visitors. Clay had been Speaker of the House, Secretary of State, and a presidential candidate by the time he made his appearance in 1830. Clay received a gift of magnolia plants from Monmouth and urged Quitman to visit his estate, Ashland, some day so he could "witness their prosperous growth."  In a letter to Clay, dated April 3, 1830, Quitman apologized for his trusty servant's failure to locate Magnolia trees for Clay during the Kentuckian's visit to Monmouth. Clay was one of the "Great Triumvirate" or the "Immortal Trio" of Congressional leaders, along with his Congressional colleagues John Calhoun and Daniel Webster.  In 1957, a Senate Committee selected Henry Clay as one of the five greatest U.S. Senators, along with John Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Robert La Follette, and Robert Taft. Calhoun, Clay, Jackson, and Quitman were acquainted with one another throughout their political careers. This room is located on the second floor of the Main House, and is accessed by stairs and located above our Restaurant 1818.

ANTEBELLUM ROOM - Queen bed, 2nd floor, opens to central hallway

 


 

Miss Eliza's Room 25

Miss Eliza's Room 25 Miss Eliza's room from angle Sitting area in Miss Eliza's Room

Eliza Turner Quitman married John Quitman in 1824, when she was 16 years of age. She was from a very wealthy, influential family in Natchez, and John Quitman was a new attorney in town from New York. Of the 11/12 children she had, only 5 lived to adulthood. She died in 1859, some say of a broken heart after the death of her beloved husband, John, only 1 year after his death. This is one of three Superior Suites, and is one of the largest. Located on the second floor of the Main House, this suite is decorated in high antebellum style, and is a study in luxury!

ANTEBELLUM SUPERIOR SUITE – Queen bed, ½ canopy, 2nd floor, single daybed, 2 full baths

 


 

Want to stay in a specific room? Please call 601.442.5852 to make your reservation. Due to our intimate size, every effort is made to honor a  request for a specific room; however, Monmouth can only guarantee the "room category" when you make a reservation online.  In the event the "room category" reserved is not available the day of check-in, Monmouth will upgrade a reservation to a higher category room at no additional charge.  

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